THE RISK OF THE DRUGS AND UNSAVE SEXUAL

Posted by agus suwardi On 0 komentar
“SAVE OUR GENERATION FROM DRUGS AND UNSAVE SEXUAL”
Drugs and sex, we usually hear about the both of them, and I think everybody will know about the effect of them for our health and for our generation. They are cause of many diseases, death, HIV AIDS, and many bad effects for human. The relationship between drug use and unsafe sexual practices among gay men has been shown in many studies. These unsafe sexual practices put gay and bisexual men at greater risk for HIV infection. Gay and bisexual men who do not use drugs report fewer acts of incentive and receptive anal intercourse without condoms than do recreational drug-using gay and bisexual men.


“SAVE OUR GENERATION FROM DRUGS AND UNSAVE SEXUAL”
Drugs and sex, we usually hear about the both of them, and I think everybody will know about the effect of them for our health and for our generation. They are cause of many diseases, death, HIV AIDS, and many bad effects for human. The relationship between drug use and unsafe sexual practices among gay men has been shown in many studies. These unsafe sexual practices put gay and bisexual men at greater risk for HIV infection. Gay and bisexual men who do not use drugs report fewer acts of incentive and receptive anal intercourse without condoms than do recreational drug-using gay and bisexual men.
Methamphetamine shows documented prevalence rates ranging between 5 percent and 25 percent of the gay and bisexual men studied across many cities from Honolulu to Denver. It is used to increase sensory experiences, especially sexual ones, and to create feelings of euphoria, which may contribute to increased sexual risk-taking. It has been associated with infrequent use of condoms, perhaps as a result of the above factors.
Methamphetamines can also increase risk for HIV/AIDS by increasing sexual sensation at the same time that it may interfere with erections, colloquially referred to as "crystal dick." A result of this problem can create "instant bottoms," a term applied by gay and bisexual men to drug users who take on the receptive role during anal intercourse. This practice is the riskiest sexual behavior that may cause HIV infection, particularly when condoms are not used. Gay and bisexual men who use amphetamines have 2.9 times greater risk of HIV infection through receptive anal intercourse than men who do not use the drug. Use of any stimulant drug, not just methamphetamines, has been associated with unprotected anal intercourse.
MDMA was reported to be in wide use among gay and bisexual men recruited from three dance clubs in New York City, and was found to be the only recreational drug associated with unsafe sex in this sample. Other drugs have been related to high-risk sexual behavior in different studies.
Circuit party weekends have also been associated with high-risk sexual behavior. A study by Mansergh et al. reported that 29 percent of their sample of gay and bisexual men had multiple sex partners during a single circuit party weekend. Of this higher-risk group, 47 percent reported unprotected anal sex. They concluded that sexual activity, including unprotected anal sex, was relatively common during these weekends.
Colfax and his associates studied 295 gay/bisexual men in San Francisco and measured drug use and sexual risk-taking during a San Francisco circuit party (CP), a circuit party held in another geographical area (distant CP), and non-CP party weekends. They found a high use of drugs during CPs. For example, at a distant CP, 80 percent used MDMA, 66 percent used ketamine, and 43 percent used crystal methamphetamines. Drug use during CP weekends was greater than during non-CP weekends.
Unprotected anal sex with partners of unknown or opposite HIV serostatus was most prevalent during distant CP weekends, perhaps because the gay/bisexual men felt less inhibited away from their own city and took more sexual risks. The strongest predictors of unprotected anal sex with opposite or unknown serostatus partners were being HIV-positive and use of crystal methamphetamines, Viagra, or amyl nitrites. The authors conclude that the level of high-risk activity during circuit parties suggests significant potential for HIV transmission.
In another study on circuit parties, Mattison et al. found that use of amyl nitrites (poppers), MDMA, ketamine, crystal methamphetamines, and GHB were associated with unsafe sex. In a large nonrandom sample of party attendees, more than 50 percent reported using alcohol, MDMA, and ketamine. Frequent use of MDMA, ketamine, and poppers had a significant association with unsafe sex at parties. Crystal methamphetamines and GHB only showed a trend although in the expected direction.
Chesney et al. suggest that conversion may be mediated by these drug-related factors:
• Stimulants and inhalants increasing arousal and delaying ejaculation.
• Disinhibition effects of drugs.
• Substance abuse and high-risk sexual behaviors occurring within social networks if unprotected anal intercourse is a norm in such networks and there is a high-risk background prevalence of HIV.
Club drugs, in particular MDMA, methamphetamines, and poppers, encourage risky sexual practices, at least among gay/bisexual men, such as multiple sexual partners and unprotected anal or receptive anal intercourse, and thus increase the risk of HIV/AIDS. Circuit parties, especially distant circuit parties, encourage high-risk sexual behaviors and club drug use among gay and bisexual men. We are not aware of studies focusing on raves with a primarily heterosexual population and increased risk for HIV/AIDS. write by :Devi Pebriani

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